Are Flying Cars just Helicopters?

Image result for car with helicopter blades
@tarafugia

Back to the Future predicted we’d have flying cars by 2015. Now, 4 years later than the promised date, we’ve only seen hints at such a technology. I’ve never been a fan of the flying car. It seems completely ridiculous to me. Especially since drivers in normal cars can barely get their act together. The last thing we need is to have some lady eating a cheeseburger with her mutt on her lap, criss-crossing across the sky in a flying tank. Talk about road-rage (technically it’d be sky-rage right?).

Yes, I know I’m pessimistic about it. I blame Neil deGrasse Tyson. I listened to a podcast with him some time ago (if you’re interested in the video clip, here you go). In that podcast he had described how the search for flying cars has already been solved: they’re called helicopters. He goes on to describe how 3-dimensional travel has already been achieved as well: they’re called bridges and tunnels. Let’s insert Elon Musk’s tunnel plan below.

So, assuming tunnels become the newest way to travel (which quite honestly is a brilliant idea), are we still going to pursue flying cars – I mean, helicopters – for the average person? I stumbled across this hilarious video last night. And yes, I know, there should be better technology than an old tin can with blades on top in a few years. But if you don’t find this terrifying, you should reevaluate some stuff. Let’s hope videos like this make the public reassess the fascination that was instilled in us from the movie adventures of Marty McFly.

The Silence of the Future

Image result for galaxy buds
@9to5google

We’ve all seen the AirPods. Everywhere. The little white sticks that awkwardly poke out of people’s ears. My roommate has a pair – and she owns an Android. They’ve taken over the market in one fell swoop, and as you can maybe tell by my tone of voice, I’m slightly displeased about it.

I’ve loved Apple for years, but what irks me most about this trend, is that the design hasn’t really changed – if at all (I’ll admit I haven’t done a lot of research on them) – from their original headphones. It seems as if they chopped off the chords, packaged them in a fancy Tic Tac box, added another zero to the price tag, and called it a day. And everyone went freaking nuts.

I’ve tried them in person (thanks roomie), and I don’t hate them. But quite honestly, I’ll stick to my normal buds, or my big noise-canceling headphones. Which takes me to my topic of the day: what should headphones do when they’re not playing music?

Insofar, headphones have been meant for mainly one thing: music. As somewhat of a purist, I’d argue that maybe that’s all we should be looking for in these products. But wait…there’s more! I’ve seen an increase in the amount of headphones that now have specific purposes. My sister received a set of ear pods as a gift last year. Which, by the way, has there been an official ruling of what to call wireless headphones yet? “AirPods” are strictly Apple, “ear buds” have been around for years so it still connotes wires/cords, and just “pods” sounds strangely biological and invasive.

I’ll be calling them “ear pods” for the remainder of this post, even though I don’t enjoy that either. Regardless, these things she had received, were only meant to play different white noise sounds. I forget the brand, but the premise behind their product was to create a wireless headphone that would put you to sleep – blocking out your immediate surroundings – and gently wake you up. The app that came with it gave you noise options to choose from: waterfalls, crickets, brown noise, white noise, rain, wind, etc. And then it gave you alarm options.

I tried these out – mid airplane flight was probably not the best scenario – and found myself indifferent. Now, if I lived in an extremely busy city with sirens and barking dogs and yelling neighbors, maybe I could see myself wanting to block all of that and fall asleep with these plastic blobs in my ears. I’m still not convinced there’s enough of a reason, or genuine personal curiosity, for me to go out and buy a pair right now.

But, I will say, there is definitely a market for companies to improve upon the horrendous (merely personal opinion) white ear sticks. Take Galaxy for example:

Hopefully you watched the video, because this post is already dragging on, and I won’t do it justice. It’s an interesting idea – having a music-playing product become something that only creates silence. The visuals are great, the technology is cool, and maybe down the line, I’ll understand what the hype is, and pick a pair of blobs up for myself. Until then, I’ll stick to my corded headphones like a 2000s peasant.